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Comparing weight loss surgery options

  GASTRIC BYPASS LAP BAND LAPAROSCOPIC SLEEVE GASTRECTOMY
About the Procedure The stomach is made smaller by creating a small pouch; the small intestine is re-routed and attached directly to the pouch. A gastric band is placed on the upper part of the stomach, creating a small pouch to hold food. The tightness of the band how much food you can eat. The surgeon removes about 85 percent of the stomach to limit the food ingested without altering the normal absorption of vitamins and minerals.
Type of Surgery Open or laparascopic Laparascopic Laparascopic
Average Hospital Stay 2-3 days 1-2 days 2-3 days
How Digestion Is Affected Food bypasses a portion of the small intestine and the amount of food is limited. Patients absorb fewer calories and nutrients Food passes through the normal digestive tract, allowing it to be fully absorbed. The band limits the amount of food you can eat at one time so you feel full for a longer time. Food passes through the normal digestive tract, allowing it to be fully absorbed. The smaller stomach limits the amount of food you can eat at one time, so you feel full for a longer time.
Expected Weight Loss 70-80 percent of excess weight loss at one year 55 percent of excess weight loss at two years 55 percent of excess weight loss at two years
Diet/Lifestyle Changes Required Less than 800 calories consumed per day for the first 12-18 months. Can increase caloric intake to 1,000-1,200 daily thereafter. Must avoid sugar and fats to prevent the “dumping syndrome.” Must take vitamin supplements and exercise daily Less than 800 calories consumed per day for the first 18-36 months. Can increase caloric intake to 1,000-2,000 daily thereafter. Must avoid certain foods that can get “stuck” if eaten, such as rice, dense meats, nuts and popcorn, which can cause pain and vomiting. Can’t drink fluids during meals. Must exercise daily. Less than 800 calories consumed per day for the first 12-18 months. Can increase caloric intake to 1,000-1,200 daily thereafter. Must take vitamin supplements andexercise daily.
Benefits Endorsed by the National Institutes of Health, gastric bypass is the most common bariatric surgery performed in the U.S. High percentage of weight loss. Short surgical recovery time. Endorsed by the National Institutes of Health. Approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Allows for the most “normal” eating with few food intolerances. Relatively safe option for “very ill” and older patients. Has a lower complication rate due to the simplicity of the surgery.
Potential Problems Anemia
Bowel obstruction
Dumping syndrome
Leaks
Osteoporosis
Ulcers
Vitamin/mineral deficiencies
Slower weight loss
Band slippage
Band erosion
Infection
Port problems
Device malfunction
Risk of weight regain over time
Nausea and vomiting
Heartburn
Leaks
Ideal Candidates Severely obese (BMI of 35+) for more than 5 years.
Non-surgical serious weight loss attempts unsuccessful.
Willing to make serious lifestyle changes.
Considered the “gold standard procedure for weight loss in the U.S. Most insurance plans will cover.
Severely obese (BMI of 35+) for more than 5 years.
Non-surgical serious weight loss attempts unsuccessful.
Willing to make serious lifestyle changes.
Some insurance companies will cover.
Patients with a BMI between 32 - 60.
Nonsurgical serious weight loss attempts unsuccessful.
Willing to make serious lifestyle changes.
Some insurance companies will cover.
*As with any type of surgery, weight loss surgery involves risks. However, many of these risks can be eliminated and/or minimized with a proper nutritional diet and regular physical exercise. Consult with your physician before committing to any type of surgery.
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